thread
index
(built-in)

This module provides primitive operations to write multi-threaded programs.
The 'threading' module provides a more convenient interface.

 
Classes
            
exceptions.Exception
error
__builtin__.object
lock
 
LockType = class lock(__builtin__.object)
      A lock object is a synchronization primitive.  To create a lock,
call the PyThread_allocate_lock() function.  Methods are:
 
acquire() -- lock the lock, possibly blocking until it can be obtained
release() -- unlock of the lock
locked() -- test whether the lock is currently locked
 
A lock is not owned by the thread that locked it; another thread may
unlock it.  A thread attempting to lock a lock that it has already locked
will block until another thread unlocks it.  Deadlocks may ensue.
 
   Methods inherited from __builtin__.object:
__delattr__(...)
x.__delattr__('name') <==> del x.name
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature
__reduce__(...)
helper for pickle
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__setattr__(...)
x.__setattr__('name', value) <==> x.name = value
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)

Data and non-method functions inherited from __builtin__.object:
__class__ = <type 'type'>
the object's class
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T
 
class error(exceptions.Exception)
       
   Data and non-method functions defined here:
__doc__ = None
__module__ = 'thread'

Methods inherited from exceptions.Exception:
__getitem__(...)
__init__(...)
__str__(...)
 
Functions
            
allocate(...)
allocate_lock() -> lock object
(allocate() is an obsolete synonym)
 
Create a new lock object.  See LockType.__doc__ for information about locks.
allocate_lock(...)
allocate_lock() -> lock object
(allocate() is an obsolete synonym)
 
Create a new lock object.  See LockType.__doc__ for information about locks.
exit(...)
exit()
(PyThread_exit_thread() is an obsolete synonym)
 
This is synonymous to ``raise SystemExit''.  It will cause the current
thread to exit silently unless the exception is caught.
exit_thread(...)
exit()
(PyThread_exit_thread() is an obsolete synonym)
 
This is synonymous to ``raise SystemExit''.  It will cause the current
thread to exit silently unless the exception is caught.
get_ident(...)
get_ident() -> integer
 
Return a non-zero integer that uniquely identifies the current thread
amongst other threads that exist simultaneously.
This may be used to identify per-thread resources.
Even though on some platforms threads identities may appear to be
allocated consecutive numbers starting at 1, this behavior should not
be relied upon, and the number should be seen purely as a magic cookie.
A thread's identity may be reused for another thread after it exits.
start_new(...)
start_new_thread(function, args[, kwargs])
(start_new() is an obsolete synonym)
 
Start a new thread and return its identifier.  The thread will call the
function with positional arguments from the tuple args and keyword arguments
taken from the optional dictionary kwargs.  The thread exits when the
function returns; the return value is ignored.  The thread will also exit
when the function raises an unhandled exception; a stack trace will be
printed unless the exception is SystemExit.
start_new_thread(...)
start_new_thread(function, args[, kwargs])
(start_new() is an obsolete synonym)
 
Start a new thread and return its identifier.  The thread will call the
function with positional arguments from the tuple args and keyword arguments
taken from the optional dictionary kwargs.  The thread exits when the
function returns; the return value is ignored.  The thread will also exit
when the function raises an unhandled exception; a stack trace will be
printed unless the exception is SystemExit.
 
Data
             __name__ = 'thread'