__builtin__
index
(built-in)

Built-in functions, exceptions, and other objects.
 
Noteworthy: None is the `nil' object; Ellipsis represents `...' in slices.

 
Classes
       
object
basestring
str
unicode
buffer
classmethod
complex
dict
enumerate
file
float
frozenset
int
bool
list
long
property
reversed
set
slice
staticmethod
super
tuple
type
xrange

 
class basestring(object)
    Type basestring cannot be instantiated; it is the base for str and unicode.
 
  Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812f120>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class bool(int)
    bool(x) -> bool
 
Returns True when the argument x is true, False otherwise.
The builtins True and False are the only two instances of the class bool.
The class bool is a subclass of the class int, and cannot be subclassed.
 
 
Method resolution order:
bool
int
object

Methods defined here:
__and__(...)
x.__and__(y) <==> x&y
__or__(...)
x.__or__(y) <==> x|y
__rand__(...)
x.__rand__(y) <==> y&x
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__ror__(...)
x.__ror__(y) <==> y|x
__rxor__(...)
x.__rxor__(y) <==> y^x
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)
__xor__(...)
x.__xor__(y) <==> x^y

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8124ac0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

Methods inherited from int:
__abs__(...)
x.__abs__() <==> abs(x)
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__coerce__(...)
x.__coerce__(y) <==> coerce(x, y)
__div__(...)
x.__div__(y) <==> x/y
__divmod__(...)
x.__divmod__(y) <==> divmod(x, y)
__float__(...)
x.__float__() <==> float(x)
__floordiv__(...)
x.__floordiv__(y) <==> x//y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getnewargs__(...)
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__hex__(...)
x.__hex__() <==> hex(x)
__index__(...)
x[y:z] <==> x[y.__index__():z.__index__()]
__int__(...)
x.__int__() <==> int(x)
__invert__(...)
x.__invert__() <==> ~x
__long__(...)
x.__long__() <==> long(x)
__lshift__(...)
x.__lshift__(y) <==> x<<y
__mod__(...)
x.__mod__(y) <==> x%y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(y) <==> x*y
__neg__(...)
x.__neg__() <==> -x
__nonzero__(...)
x.__nonzero__() <==> x != 0
__oct__(...)
x.__oct__() <==> oct(x)
__pos__(...)
x.__pos__() <==> +x
__pow__(...)
x.__pow__(y[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__radd__(...)
x.__radd__(y) <==> y+x
__rdiv__(...)
x.__rdiv__(y) <==> y/x
__rdivmod__(...)
x.__rdivmod__(y) <==> divmod(y, x)
__rfloordiv__(...)
x.__rfloordiv__(y) <==> y//x
__rlshift__(...)
x.__rlshift__(y) <==> y<<x
__rmod__(...)
x.__rmod__(y) <==> y%x
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(y) <==> y*x
__rpow__(...)
y.__rpow__(x[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__rrshift__(...)
x.__rrshift__(y) <==> y>>x
__rshift__(...)
x.__rshift__(y) <==> x>>y
__rsub__(...)
x.__rsub__(y) <==> y-x
__rtruediv__(...)
x.__rtruediv__(y) <==> y/x
__sub__(...)
x.__sub__(y) <==> x-y
__truediv__(...)
x.__truediv__(y) <==> x/y

 
class buffer(object)
    buffer(object [, offset[, size]])
 
Create a new buffer object which references the given object.
The buffer will reference a slice of the target object from the
start of the object (or at the specified offset). The slice will
extend to the end of the target object (or with the specified size).
 
  Methods defined here:
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__delitem__(...)
x.__delitem__(y) <==> del x[y]
__delslice__(...)
x.__delslice__(i, j) <==> del x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__getslice__(...)
x.__getslice__(i, j) <==> x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(n) <==> x*n
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(n) <==> n*x
__setitem__(...)
x.__setitem__(i, y) <==> x[i]=y
__setslice__(...)
x.__setslice__(i, j, y) <==> x[i:j]=y
 
Use  of negative indices is not supported.
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x81482a0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class classmethod(object)
    classmethod(function) -> method
 
Convert a function to be a class method.
 
A class method receives the class as implicit first argument,
just like an instance method receives the instance.
To declare a class method, use this idiom:
 
  class C:
      def f(cls, arg1, arg2, ...): ...
      f = classmethod(f)
 
It can be called either on the class (e.g. C.f()) or on an instance
(e.g. C().f()).  The instance is ignored except for its class.
If a class method is called for a derived class, the derived class
object is passed as the implied first argument.
 
Class methods are different than C++ or Java static methods.
If you want those, see the staticmethod builtin.
 
  Methods defined here:
__get__(...)
descr.__get__(obj[, type]) -> value
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x814a5c0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class complex(object)
    complex(real[, imag]) -> complex number
 
Create a complex number from a real part and an optional imaginary part.
This is equivalent to (real + imag*1j) where imag defaults to 0.
 
  Methods defined here:
__abs__(...)
x.__abs__() <==> abs(x)
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__coerce__(...)
x.__coerce__(y) <==> coerce(x, y)
__div__(...)
x.__div__(y) <==> x/y
__divmod__(...)
x.__divmod__(y) <==> divmod(x, y)
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__float__(...)
x.__float__() <==> float(x)
__floordiv__(...)
x.__floordiv__(y) <==> x//y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getnewargs__(...)
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__int__(...)
x.__int__() <==> int(x)
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__long__(...)
x.__long__() <==> long(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__mod__(...)
x.__mod__(y) <==> x%y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(y) <==> x*y
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__neg__(...)
x.__neg__() <==> -x
__nonzero__(...)
x.__nonzero__() <==> x != 0
__pos__(...)
x.__pos__() <==> +x
__pow__(...)
x.__pow__(y[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__radd__(...)
x.__radd__(y) <==> y+x
__rdiv__(...)
x.__rdiv__(y) <==> y/x
__rdivmod__(...)
x.__rdivmod__(y) <==> divmod(y, x)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__rfloordiv__(...)
x.__rfloordiv__(y) <==> y//x
__rmod__(...)
x.__rmod__(y) <==> y%x
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(y) <==> y*x
__rpow__(...)
y.__rpow__(x[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__rsub__(...)
x.__rsub__(y) <==> y-x
__rtruediv__(...)
x.__rtruediv__(y) <==> y/x
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)
__sub__(...)
x.__sub__(y) <==> x-y
__truediv__(...)
x.__truediv__(y) <==> x/y
conjugate(...)

Data descriptors defined here:
imag
the imaginary part of a complex number
real
the real part of a complex number

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8148b80>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class dict(object)
    dict() -> new empty dictionary.
dict(mapping) -> new dictionary initialized from a mapping object's
    (key, value) pairs.
dict(seq) -> new dictionary initialized as if via:
    d = {}
    for k, v in seq:
        d[k] = v
dict(**kwargs) -> new dictionary initialized with the name=value pairs
    in the keyword argument list.  For example:  dict(one=1, two=2)
 
  Methods defined here:
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__contains__(...)
D.__contains__(k) -> True if D has a key k, else False
__delitem__(...)
x.__delitem__(y) <==> del x[y]
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__setitem__(...)
x.__setitem__(i, y) <==> x[i]=y
clear(...)
D.clear() -> None.  Remove all items from D.
copy(...)
D.copy() -> a shallow copy of D
get(...)
D.get(k[,d]) -> D[k] if k in D, else d.  d defaults to None.
has_key(...)
D.has_key(k) -> True if D has a key k, else False
items(...)
D.items() -> list of D's (key, value) pairs, as 2-tuples
iteritems(...)
D.iteritems() -> an iterator over the (key, value) items of D
iterkeys(...)
D.iterkeys() -> an iterator over the keys of D
itervalues(...)
D.itervalues() -> an iterator over the values of D
keys(...)
D.keys() -> list of D's keys
pop(...)
D.pop(k[,d]) -> v, remove specified key and return the corresponding value
If key is not found, d is returned if given, otherwise KeyError is raised
popitem(...)
D.popitem() -> (k, v), remove and return some (key, value) pair as a
2-tuple; but raise KeyError if D is empty
setdefault(...)
D.setdefault(k[,d]) -> D.get(k,d), also set D[k]=d if k not in D
update(...)
D.update(E, **F) -> None.  Update D from E and F: for k in E: D[k] = E[k]
(if E has keys else: for (k, v) in E: D[k] = v) then: for k in F: D[k] = F[k]
values(...)
D.values() -> list of D's values

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812b5c0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T
fromkeys = <built-in method fromkeys of type object at 0x812b5c0>
dict.fromkeys(S[,v]) -> New dict with keys from S and values equal to v.
v defaults to None.

 
class enumerate(object)
    enumerate(iterable) -> iterator for index, value of iterable
 
Return an enumerate object.  iterable must be an other object that supports
iteration.  The enumerate object yields pairs containing a count (from
zero) and a value yielded by the iterable argument.  enumerate is useful
for obtaining an indexed list: (0, seq[0]), (1, seq[1]), (2, seq[2]), ...
 
  Methods defined here:
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
next(...)
x.next() -> the next value, or raise StopIteration

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8149900>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class file(object)
    file(name[, mode[, buffering]]) -> file object
 
Open a file.  The mode can be 'r', 'w' or 'a' for reading (default),
writing or appending.  The file will be created if it doesn't exist
when opened for writing or appending; it will be truncated when
opened for writing.  Add a 'b' to the mode for binary files.
Add a '+' to the mode to allow simultaneous reading and writing.
If the buffering argument is given, 0 means unbuffered, 1 means line
buffered, and larger numbers specify the buffer size.
Add a 'U' to mode to open the file for input with universal newline
support.  Any line ending in the input file will be seen as a '\n'
in Python.  Also, a file so opened gains the attribute 'newlines';
the value for this attribute is one of None (no newline read yet),
'\r', '\n', '\r\n' or a tuple containing all the newline types seen.
 
'U' cannot be combined with 'w' or '+' mode.
 
  Methods defined here:
__delattr__(...)
x.__delattr__('name') <==> del x.name
__enter__(...)
__enter__() -> self.
__exit__(...)
__exit__(*excinfo) -> None.  Closes the file.
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__setattr__(...)
x.__setattr__('name', value) <==> x.name = value
close(...)
close() -> None or (perhaps) an integer.  Close the file.
 
Sets data attribute .closed to True.  A closed file cannot be used for
further I/O operations.  close() may be called more than once without
error.  Some kinds of file objects (for example, opened by popen())
may return an exit status upon closing.
fileno(...)
fileno() -> integer "file descriptor".
 
This is needed for lower-level file interfaces, such os.read().
flush(...)
flush() -> None.  Flush the internal I/O buffer.
isatty(...)
isatty() -> true or false.  True if the file is connected to a tty device.
next(...)
x.next() -> the next value, or raise StopIteration
read(...)
read([size]) -> read at most size bytes, returned as a string.
 
If the size argument is negative or omitted, read until EOF is reached.
Notice that when in non-blocking mode, less data than what was requested
may be returned, even if no size parameter was given.
readinto(...)
readinto() -> Undocumented.  Don't use this; it may go away.
readline(...)
readline([size]) -> next line from the file, as a string.
 
Retain newline.  A non-negative size argument limits the maximum
number of bytes to return (an incomplete line may be returned then).
Return an empty string at EOF.
readlines(...)
readlines([size]) -> list of strings, each a line from the file.
 
Call readline() repeatedly and return a list of the lines so read.
The optional size argument, if given, is an approximate bound on the
total number of bytes in the lines returned.
seek(...)
seek(offset[, whence]) -> None.  Move to new file position.
 
Argument offset is a byte count.  Optional argument whence defaults to
0 (offset from start of file, offset should be >= 0); other values are 1
(move relative to current position, positive or negative), and 2 (move
relative to end of file, usually negative, although many platforms allow
seeking beyond the end of a file).  If the file is opened in text mode,
only offsets returned by tell() are legal.  Use of other offsets causes
undefined behavior.
Note that not all file objects are seekable.
tell(...)
tell() -> current file position, an integer (may be a long integer).
truncate(...)
truncate([size]) -> None.  Truncate the file to at most size bytes.
 
Size defaults to the current file position, as returned by tell().
write(...)
write(str) -> None.  Write string str to file.
 
Note that due to buffering, flush() or close() may be needed before
the file on disk reflects the data written.
writelines(...)
writelines(sequence_of_strings) -> None.  Write the strings to the file.
 
Note that newlines are not added.  The sequence can be any iterable object
producing strings. This is equivalent to calling write() for each string.
xreadlines(...)
xreadlines() -> returns self.
 
For backward compatibility. File objects now include the performance
optimizations previously implemented in the xreadlines module.

Data descriptors defined here:
closed
True if the file is closed
encoding
file encoding
mode
file mode ('r', 'U', 'w', 'a', possibly with 'b' or '+' added)
name
file name
newlines
end-of-line convention used in this file
softspace
flag indicating that a space needs to be printed; used by print

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8128ea0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class float(object)
    float(x) -> floating point number
 
Convert a string or number to a floating point number, if possible.
 
  Methods defined here:
__abs__(...)
x.__abs__() <==> abs(x)
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__coerce__(...)
x.__coerce__(y) <==> coerce(x, y)
__div__(...)
x.__div__(y) <==> x/y
__divmod__(...)
x.__divmod__(y) <==> divmod(x, y)
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__float__(...)
x.__float__() <==> float(x)
__floordiv__(...)
x.__floordiv__(y) <==> x//y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getnewargs__(...)
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__int__(...)
x.__int__() <==> int(x)
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__long__(...)
x.__long__() <==> long(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__mod__(...)
x.__mod__(y) <==> x%y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(y) <==> x*y
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__neg__(...)
x.__neg__() <==> -x
__nonzero__(...)
x.__nonzero__() <==> x != 0
__pos__(...)
x.__pos__() <==> +x
__pow__(...)
x.__pow__(y[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__radd__(...)
x.__radd__(y) <==> y+x
__rdiv__(...)
x.__rdiv__(y) <==> y/x
__rdivmod__(...)
x.__rdivmod__(y) <==> divmod(y, x)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__rfloordiv__(...)
x.__rfloordiv__(y) <==> y//x
__rmod__(...)
x.__rmod__(y) <==> y%x
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(y) <==> y*x
__rpow__(...)
y.__rpow__(x[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__rsub__(...)
x.__rsub__(y) <==> y-x
__rtruediv__(...)
x.__rtruediv__(y) <==> y/x
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)
__sub__(...)
x.__sub__(y) <==> x-y
__truediv__(...)
x.__truediv__(y) <==> x/y

Data and other attributes defined here:
__getformat__ = <built-in method __getformat__ of type object at 0x8129460>
float.__getformat__(typestr) -> string
 
You probably don't want to use this function.  It exists mainly to be
used in Python's test suite.
 
typestr must be 'double' or 'float'.  This function returns whichever of
'unknown', 'IEEE, big-endian' or 'IEEE, little-endian' best describes the
format of floating point numbers used by the C type named by typestr.
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8129460>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T
__setformat__ = <built-in method __setformat__ of type object at 0x8129460>
float.__setformat__(typestr, fmt) -> None
 
You probably don't want to use this function.  It exists mainly to be
used in Python's test suite.
 
typestr must be 'double' or 'float'.  fmt must be one of 'unknown',
'IEEE, big-endian' or 'IEEE, little-endian', and in addition can only be
one of the latter two if it appears to match the underlying C reality.
 
Overrides the automatic determination of C-level floating point type.
This affects how floats are converted to and from binary strings.

 
class frozenset(object)
    frozenset(iterable) --> frozenset object
 
Build an immutable unordered collection of unique elements.
 
  Methods defined here:
__and__(...)
x.__and__(y) <==> x&y
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__contains__(...)
x.__contains__(y) <==> y in x.
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__or__(...)
x.__or__(y) <==> x|y
__rand__(...)
x.__rand__(y) <==> y&x
__reduce__(...)
Return state information for pickling.
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__ror__(...)
x.__ror__(y) <==> y|x
__rsub__(...)
x.__rsub__(y) <==> y-x
__rxor__(...)
x.__rxor__(y) <==> y^x
__sub__(...)
x.__sub__(y) <==> x-y
__xor__(...)
x.__xor__(y) <==> x^y
copy(...)
Return a shallow copy of a set.
difference(...)
Return the difference of two sets as a new set.
 
(i.e. all elements that are in this set but not the other.)
intersection(...)
Return the intersection of two sets as a new set.
 
(i.e. all elements that are in both sets.)
issubset(...)
Report whether another set contains this set.
issuperset(...)
Report whether this set contains another set.
symmetric_difference(...)
Return the symmetric difference of two sets as a new set.
 
(i.e. all elements that are in exactly one of the sets.)
union(...)
Return the union of two sets as a new set.
 
(i.e. all elements that are in either set.)

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812c9c0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class int(object)
    int(x[, base]) -> integer
 
Convert a string or number to an integer, if possible.  A floating point
argument will be truncated towards zero (this does not include a string
representation of a floating point number!)  When converting a string, use
the optional base.  It is an error to supply a base when converting a
non-string. If the argument is outside the integer range a long object
will be returned instead.
 
  Methods defined here:
__abs__(...)
x.__abs__() <==> abs(x)
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__and__(...)
x.__and__(y) <==> x&y
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__coerce__(...)
x.__coerce__(y) <==> coerce(x, y)
__div__(...)
x.__div__(y) <==> x/y
__divmod__(...)
x.__divmod__(y) <==> divmod(x, y)
__float__(...)
x.__float__() <==> float(x)
__floordiv__(...)
x.__floordiv__(y) <==> x//y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getnewargs__(...)
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__hex__(...)
x.__hex__() <==> hex(x)
__index__(...)
x[y:z] <==> x[y.__index__():z.__index__()]
__int__(...)
x.__int__() <==> int(x)
__invert__(...)
x.__invert__() <==> ~x
__long__(...)
x.__long__() <==> long(x)
__lshift__(...)
x.__lshift__(y) <==> x<<y
__mod__(...)
x.__mod__(y) <==> x%y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(y) <==> x*y
__neg__(...)
x.__neg__() <==> -x
__nonzero__(...)
x.__nonzero__() <==> x != 0
__oct__(...)
x.__oct__() <==> oct(x)
__or__(...)
x.__or__(y) <==> x|y
__pos__(...)
x.__pos__() <==> +x
__pow__(...)
x.__pow__(y[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__radd__(...)
x.__radd__(y) <==> y+x
__rand__(...)
x.__rand__(y) <==> y&x
__rdiv__(...)
x.__rdiv__(y) <==> y/x
__rdivmod__(...)
x.__rdivmod__(y) <==> divmod(y, x)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__rfloordiv__(...)
x.__rfloordiv__(y) <==> y//x
__rlshift__(...)
x.__rlshift__(y) <==> y<<x
__rmod__(...)
x.__rmod__(y) <==> y%x
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(y) <==> y*x
__ror__(...)
x.__ror__(y) <==> y|x
__rpow__(...)
y.__rpow__(x[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__rrshift__(...)
x.__rrshift__(y) <==> y>>x
__rshift__(...)
x.__rshift__(y) <==> x>>y
__rsub__(...)
x.__rsub__(y) <==> y-x
__rtruediv__(...)
x.__rtruediv__(y) <==> y/x
__rxor__(...)
x.__rxor__(y) <==> y^x
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)
__sub__(...)
x.__sub__(y) <==> x-y
__truediv__(...)
x.__truediv__(y) <==> x/y
__xor__(...)
x.__xor__(y) <==> x^y

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x81297c0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class list(object)
    list() -> new list
list(sequence) -> new list initialized from sequence's items
 
  Methods defined here:
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__contains__(...)
x.__contains__(y) <==> y in x
__delitem__(...)
x.__delitem__(y) <==> del x[y]
__delslice__(...)
x.__delslice__(i, j) <==> del x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__getslice__(...)
x.__getslice__(i, j) <==> x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__iadd__(...)
x.__iadd__(y) <==> x+=y
__imul__(...)
x.__imul__(y) <==> x*=y
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(n) <==> x*n
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__reversed__(...)
L.__reversed__() -- return a reverse iterator over the list
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(n) <==> n*x
__setitem__(...)
x.__setitem__(i, y) <==> x[i]=y
__setslice__(...)
x.__setslice__(i, j, y) <==> x[i:j]=y
 
Use  of negative indices is not supported.
append(...)
L.append(object) -- append object to end
count(...)
L.count(value) -> integer -- return number of occurrences of value
extend(...)
L.extend(iterable) -- extend list by appending elements from the iterable
index(...)
L.index(value, [start, [stop]]) -> integer -- return first index of value
insert(...)
L.insert(index, object) -- insert object before index
pop(...)
L.pop([index]) -> item -- remove and return item at index (default last)
remove(...)
L.remove(value) -- remove first occurrence of value
reverse(...)
L.reverse() -- reverse *IN PLACE*
sort(...)
L.sort(cmp=None, key=None, reverse=False) -- stable sort *IN PLACE*;
cmp(x, y) -> -1, 0, 1

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812a140>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class long(object)
    long(x[, base]) -> integer
 
Convert a string or number to a long integer, if possible.  A floating
point argument will be truncated towards zero (this does not include a
string representation of a floating point number!)  When converting a
string, use the optional base.  It is an error to supply a base when
converting a non-string.
 
  Methods defined here:
__abs__(...)
x.__abs__() <==> abs(x)
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__and__(...)
x.__and__(y) <==> x&y
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__coerce__(...)
x.__coerce__(y) <==> coerce(x, y)
__div__(...)
x.__div__(y) <==> x/y
__divmod__(...)
x.__divmod__(y) <==> divmod(x, y)
__float__(...)
x.__float__() <==> float(x)
__floordiv__(...)
x.__floordiv__(y) <==> x//y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getnewargs__(...)
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__hex__(...)
x.__hex__() <==> hex(x)
__index__(...)
x[y:z] <==> x[y.__index__():z.__index__()]
__int__(...)
x.__int__() <==> int(x)
__invert__(...)
x.__invert__() <==> ~x
__long__(...)
x.__long__() <==> long(x)
__lshift__(...)
x.__lshift__(y) <==> x<<y
__mod__(...)
x.__mod__(y) <==> x%y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(y) <==> x*y
__neg__(...)
x.__neg__() <==> -x
__nonzero__(...)
x.__nonzero__() <==> x != 0
__oct__(...)
x.__oct__() <==> oct(x)
__or__(...)
x.__or__(y) <==> x|y
__pos__(...)
x.__pos__() <==> +x
__pow__(...)
x.__pow__(y[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__radd__(...)
x.__radd__(y) <==> y+x
__rand__(...)
x.__rand__(y) <==> y&x
__rdiv__(...)
x.__rdiv__(y) <==> y/x
__rdivmod__(...)
x.__rdivmod__(y) <==> divmod(y, x)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__rfloordiv__(...)
x.__rfloordiv__(y) <==> y//x
__rlshift__(...)
x.__rlshift__(y) <==> y<<x
__rmod__(...)
x.__rmod__(y) <==> y%x
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(y) <==> y*x
__ror__(...)
x.__ror__(y) <==> y|x
__rpow__(...)
y.__rpow__(x[, z]) <==> pow(x, y[, z])
__rrshift__(...)
x.__rrshift__(y) <==> y>>x
__rshift__(...)
x.__rshift__(y) <==> x>>y
__rsub__(...)
x.__rsub__(y) <==> y-x
__rtruediv__(...)
x.__rtruediv__(y) <==> y/x
__rxor__(...)
x.__rxor__(y) <==> y^x
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)
__sub__(...)
x.__sub__(y) <==> x-y
__truediv__(...)
x.__truediv__(y) <==> x/y
__xor__(...)
x.__xor__(y) <==> x^y

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812ace0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class object
    The most base type
 
 

 
class property(object)
    property(fget=None, fset=None, fdel=None, doc=None) -> property attribute
 
fget is a function to be used for getting an attribute value, and likewise
fset is a function for setting, and fdel a function for del'ing, an
attribute.  Typical use is to define a managed attribute x:
class C(object):
    def getx(self): return self.__x
    def setx(self, value): self.__x = value
    def delx(self): del self.__x
    x = property(getx, setx, delx, "I'm the 'x' property.")
 
  Methods defined here:
__delete__(...)
descr.__delete__(obj)
__get__(...)
descr.__get__(obj[, type]) -> value
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature
__set__(...)
descr.__set__(obj, value)

Data descriptors defined here:
fdel
fget
fset

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x81496c0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class reversed(object)
    reversed(sequence) -> reverse iterator over values of the sequence
 
Return a reverse iterator
 
  Methods defined here:
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
__length_hint__(...)
Private method returning an estimate of len(list(it)).
next(...)
x.next() -> the next value, or raise StopIteration

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8149a80>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class set(object)
    set(iterable) --> set object
 
Build an unordered collection of unique elements.
 
  Methods defined here:
__and__(...)
x.__and__(y) <==> x&y
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__contains__(...)
x.__contains__(y) <==> y in x.
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__iand__(...)
x.__iand__(y) <==> x&y
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature
__ior__(...)
x.__ior__(y) <==> x|y
__isub__(...)
x.__isub__(y) <==> x-y
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
__ixor__(...)
x.__ixor__(y) <==> x^y
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__or__(...)
x.__or__(y) <==> x|y
__rand__(...)
x.__rand__(y) <==> y&x
__reduce__(...)
Return state information for pickling.
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__ror__(...)
x.__ror__(y) <==> y|x
__rsub__(...)
x.__rsub__(y) <==> y-x
__rxor__(...)
x.__rxor__(y) <==> y^x
__sub__(...)
x.__sub__(y) <==> x-y
__xor__(...)
x.__xor__(y) <==> x^y
add(...)
Add an element to a set.
 
This has no effect if the element is already present.
clear(...)
Remove all elements from this set.
copy(...)
Return a shallow copy of a set.
difference(...)
Return the difference of two sets as a new set.
 
(i.e. all elements that are in this set but not the other.)
difference_update(...)
Remove all elements of another set from this set.
discard(...)
Remove an element from a set if it is a member.
 
If the element is not a member, do nothing.
intersection(...)
Return the intersection of two sets as a new set.
 
(i.e. all elements that are in both sets.)
intersection_update(...)
Update a set with the intersection of itself and another.
issubset(...)
Report whether another set contains this set.
issuperset(...)
Report whether this set contains another set.
pop(...)
Remove and return an arbitrary set element.
remove(...)
Remove an element from a set; it must be a member.
 
If the element is not a member, raise a KeyError.
symmetric_difference(...)
Return the symmetric difference of two sets as a new set.
 
(i.e. all elements that are in exactly one of the sets.)
symmetric_difference_update(...)
Update a set with the symmetric difference of itself and another.
union(...)
Return the union of two sets as a new set.
 
(i.e. all elements that are in either set.)
update(...)
Update a set with the union of itself and another.

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812c740>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class slice(object)
    slice([start,] stop[, step])
 
Create a slice object.  This is used for extended slicing (e.g. a[0:10:2]).
 
  Methods defined here:
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
indices(...)
S.indices(len) -> (start, stop, stride)
 
Assuming a sequence of length len, calculate the start and stop
indices, and the stride length of the extended slice described by
S. Out of bounds indices are clipped in a manner consistent with the
handling of normal slices.

Data descriptors defined here:
start
step
stop

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812cd80>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class staticmethod(object)
    staticmethod(function) -> method
 
Convert a function to be a static method.
 
A static method does not receive an implicit first argument.
To declare a static method, use this idiom:
 
     class C:
         def f(arg1, arg2, ...): ...
         f = staticmethod(f)
 
It can be called either on the class (e.g. C.f()) or on an instance
(e.g. C().f()).  The instance is ignored except for its class.
 
Static methods in Python are similar to those found in Java or C++.
For a more advanced concept, see the classmethod builtin.
 
  Methods defined here:
__get__(...)
descr.__get__(obj[, type]) -> value
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x814a8a0>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class str(basestring)
    str(object) -> string
 
Return a nice string representation of the object.
If the argument is a string, the return value is the same object.
 
 
Method resolution order:
str
basestring
object

Methods defined here:
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__contains__(...)
x.__contains__(y) <==> y in x
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__getnewargs__(...)
__getslice__(...)
x.__getslice__(i, j) <==> x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__mod__(...)
x.__mod__(y) <==> x%y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(n) <==> x*n
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__rmod__(...)
x.__rmod__(y) <==> y%x
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(n) <==> n*x
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)
capitalize(...)
S.capitalize() -> string
 
Return a copy of the string S with only its first character
capitalized.
center(...)
S.center(width[, fillchar]) -> string
 
Return S centered in a string of length width. Padding is
done using the specified fill character (default is a space)
count(...)
S.count(sub[, start[, end]]) -> int
 
Return the number of non-overlapping occurrences of substring sub in
string S[start:end].  Optional arguments start and end are interpreted
as in slice notation.
decode(...)
S.decode([encoding[,errors]]) -> object
 
Decodes S using the codec registered for encoding. encoding defaults
to the default encoding. errors may be given to set a different error
handling scheme. Default is 'strict' meaning that encoding errors raise
a UnicodeDecodeError. Other possible values are 'ignore' and 'replace'
as well as any other name registerd with codecs.register_error that is
able to handle UnicodeDecodeErrors.
encode(...)
S.encode([encoding[,errors]]) -> object
 
Encodes S using the codec registered for encoding. encoding defaults
to the default encoding. errors may be given to set a different error
handling scheme. Default is 'strict' meaning that encoding errors raise
a UnicodeEncodeError. Other possible values are 'ignore', 'replace' and
'xmlcharrefreplace' as well as any other name registered with
codecs.register_error that is able to handle UnicodeEncodeErrors.
endswith(...)
S.endswith(suffix[, start[, end]]) -> bool
 
Return True if S ends with the specified suffix, False otherwise.
With optional start, test S beginning at that position.
With optional end, stop comparing S at that position.
suffix can also be a tuple of strings to try.
expandtabs(...)
S.expandtabs([tabsize]) -> string
 
Return a copy of S where all tab characters are expanded using spaces.
If tabsize is not given, a tab size of 8 characters is assumed.
find(...)
S.find(sub [,start [,end]]) -> int
 
Return the lowest index in S where substring sub is found,
such that sub is contained within s[start,end].  Optional
arguments start and end are interpreted as in slice notation.
 
Return -1 on failure.
index(...)
S.index(sub [,start [,end]]) -> int
 
Like S.find() but raise ValueError when the substring is not found.
isalnum(...)
S.isalnum() -> bool
 
Return True if all characters in S are alphanumeric
and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
isalpha(...)
S.isalpha() -> bool
 
Return True if all characters in S are alphabetic
and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
isdigit(...)
S.isdigit() -> bool
 
Return True if all characters in S are digits
and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
islower(...)
S.islower() -> bool
 
Return True if all cased characters in S are lowercase and there is
at least one cased character in S, False otherwise.
isspace(...)
S.isspace() -> bool
 
Return True if all characters in S are whitespace
and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
istitle(...)
S.istitle() -> bool
 
Return True if S is a titlecased string and there is at least one
character in S, i.e. uppercase characters may only follow uncased
characters and lowercase characters only cased ones. Return False
otherwise.
isupper(...)
S.isupper() -> bool
 
Return True if all cased characters in S are uppercase and there is
at least one cased character in S, False otherwise.
join(...)
S.join(sequence) -> string
 
Return a string which is the concatenation of the strings in the
sequence.  The separator between elements is S.
ljust(...)
S.ljust(width[, fillchar]) -> string
 
Return S left justified in a string of length width. Padding is
done using the specified fill character (default is a space).
lower(...)
S.lower() -> string
 
Return a copy of the string S converted to lowercase.
lstrip(...)
S.lstrip([chars]) -> string or unicode
 
Return a copy of the string S with leading whitespace removed.
If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
If chars is unicode, S will be converted to unicode before stripping
partition(...)
S.partition(sep) -> (head, sep, tail)
 
Searches for the separator sep in S, and returns the part before it,
the separator itself, and the part after it.  If the separator is not
found, returns S and two empty strings.
replace(...)
S.replace (old, new[, count]) -> string
 
Return a copy of string S with all occurrences of substring
old replaced by new.  If the optional argument count is
given, only the first count occurrences are replaced.
rfind(...)
S.rfind(sub [,start [,end]]) -> int
 
Return the highest index in S where substring sub is found,
such that sub is contained within s[start,end].  Optional
arguments start and end are interpreted as in slice notation.
 
Return -1 on failure.
rindex(...)
S.rindex(sub [,start [,end]]) -> int
 
Like S.rfind() but raise ValueError when the substring is not found.
rjust(...)
S.rjust(width[, fillchar]) -> string
 
Return S right justified in a string of length width. Padding is
done using the specified fill character (default is a space)
rpartition(...)
S.rpartition(sep) -> (tail, sep, head)
 
Searches for the separator sep in S, starting at the end of S, and returns
the part before it, the separator itself, and the part after it.  If the
separator is not found, returns two empty strings and S.
rsplit(...)
S.rsplit([sep [,maxsplit]]) -> list of strings
 
Return a list of the words in the string S, using sep as the
delimiter string, starting at the end of the string and working
to the front.  If maxsplit is given, at most maxsplit splits are
done. If sep is not specified or is None, any whitespace string
is a separator.
rstrip(...)
S.rstrip([chars]) -> string or unicode
 
Return a copy of the string S with trailing whitespace removed.
If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
If chars is unicode, S will be converted to unicode before stripping
split(...)
S.split([sep [,maxsplit]]) -> list of strings
 
Return a list of the words in the string S, using sep as the
delimiter string.  If maxsplit is given, at most maxsplit
splits are done. If sep is not specified or is None, any
whitespace string is a separator.
splitlines(...)
S.splitlines([keepends]) -> list of strings
 
Return a list of the lines in S, breaking at line boundaries.
Line breaks are not included in the resulting list unless keepends
is given and true.
startswith(...)
S.startswith(prefix[, start[, end]]) -> bool
 
Return True if S starts with the specified prefix, False otherwise.
With optional start, test S beginning at that position.
With optional end, stop comparing S at that position.
prefix can also be a tuple of strings to try.
strip(...)
S.strip([chars]) -> string or unicode
 
Return a copy of the string S with leading and trailing
whitespace removed.
If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
If chars is unicode, S will be converted to unicode before stripping
swapcase(...)
S.swapcase() -> string
 
Return a copy of the string S with uppercase characters
converted to lowercase and vice versa.
title(...)
S.title() -> string
 
Return a titlecased version of S, i.e. words start with uppercase
characters, all remaining cased characters have lowercase.
translate(...)
S.translate(table [,deletechars]) -> string
 
Return a copy of the string S, where all characters occurring
in the optional argument deletechars are removed, and the
remaining characters have been mapped through the given
translation table, which must be a string of length 256.
upper(...)
S.upper() -> string
 
Return a copy of the string S converted to uppercase.
zfill(...)
S.zfill(width) -> string
 
Pad a numeric string S with zeros on the left, to fill a field
of the specified width.  The string S is never truncated.

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812f280>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class super(object)
    super(type) -> unbound super object
super(type, obj) -> bound super object; requires isinstance(obj, type)
super(type, type2) -> bound super object; requires issubclass(type2, type)
Typical use to call a cooperative superclass method:
class C(B):
    def meth(self, arg):
        super(C, self).meth(arg)
 
  Methods defined here:
__get__(...)
descr.__get__(obj[, type]) -> value
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__init__(...)
x.__init__(...) initializes x; see x.__class__.__doc__ for signature
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)

Data descriptors defined here:
__self__
the instance invoking super(); may be None
__self_class__
the type of the instance invoking super(); may be None
__thisclass__
the class invoking super()

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8130800>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class tuple(object)
    tuple() -> an empty tuple
tuple(sequence) -> tuple initialized from sequence's items
 
If the argument is a tuple, the return value is the same object.
 
  Methods defined here:
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__contains__(...)
x.__contains__(y) <==> y in x
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__getnewargs__(...)
__getslice__(...)
x.__getslice__(i, j) <==> x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(n) <==> x*n
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(n) <==> n*x

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812f480>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class type(object)
    type(object) -> the object's type
type(name, bases, dict) -> a new type
 
  Methods defined here:
__call__(...)
x.__call__(...) <==> x(...)
__cmp__(...)
x.__cmp__(y) <==> cmp(x,y)
__delattr__(...)
x.__delattr__('name') <==> del x.name
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__setattr__(...)
x.__setattr__('name', value) <==> x.name = value
__subclasses__(...)
__subclasses__() -> list of immediate subclasses
mro(...)
mro() -> list
return a type's method resolution order

Data descriptors defined here:
__base__
__bases__
__basicsize__
__dict__
__dictoffset__
__flags__
__itemsize__
__mro__
__weakrefoffset__

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x812f900>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class unicode(basestring)
    unicode(string [, encoding[, errors]]) -> object
 
Create a new Unicode object from the given encoded string.
encoding defaults to the current default string encoding.
errors can be 'strict', 'replace' or 'ignore' and defaults to 'strict'.
 
 
Method resolution order:
unicode
basestring
object

Methods defined here:
__add__(...)
x.__add__(y) <==> x+y
__contains__(...)
x.__contains__(y) <==> y in x
__eq__(...)
x.__eq__(y) <==> x==y
__ge__(...)
x.__ge__(y) <==> x>=y
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__getnewargs__(...)
__getslice__(...)
x.__getslice__(i, j) <==> x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__gt__(...)
x.__gt__(y) <==> x>y
__hash__(...)
x.__hash__() <==> hash(x)
__le__(...)
x.__le__(y) <==> x<=y
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__lt__(...)
x.__lt__(y) <==> x<y
__mod__(...)
x.__mod__(y) <==> x%y
__mul__(...)
x.__mul__(n) <==> x*n
__ne__(...)
x.__ne__(y) <==> x!=y
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__rmod__(...)
x.__rmod__(y) <==> y%x
__rmul__(...)
x.__rmul__(n) <==> n*x
__str__(...)
x.__str__() <==> str(x)
capitalize(...)
S.capitalize() -> unicode
 
Return a capitalized version of S, i.e. make the first character
have upper case.
center(...)
S.center(width[, fillchar]) -> unicode
 
Return S centered in a Unicode string of length width. Padding is
done using the specified fill character (default is a space)
count(...)
S.count(sub[, start[, end]]) -> int
 
Return the number of non-overlapping occurrences of substring sub in
Unicode string S[start:end].  Optional arguments start and end are
interpreted as in slice notation.
decode(...)
S.decode([encoding[,errors]]) -> string or unicode
 
Decodes S using the codec registered for encoding. encoding defaults
to the default encoding. errors may be given to set a different error
handling scheme. Default is 'strict' meaning that encoding errors raise
a UnicodeDecodeError. Other possible values are 'ignore' and 'replace'
as well as any other name registerd with codecs.register_error that is
able to handle UnicodeDecodeErrors.
encode(...)
S.encode([encoding[,errors]]) -> string or unicode
 
Encodes S using the codec registered for encoding. encoding defaults
to the default encoding. errors may be given to set a different error
handling scheme. Default is 'strict' meaning that encoding errors raise
a UnicodeEncodeError. Other possible values are 'ignore', 'replace' and
'xmlcharrefreplace' as well as any other name registered with
codecs.register_error that can handle UnicodeEncodeErrors.
endswith(...)
S.endswith(suffix[, start[, end]]) -> bool
 
Return True if S ends with the specified suffix, False otherwise.
With optional start, test S beginning at that position.
With optional end, stop comparing S at that position.
suffix can also be a tuple of strings to try.
expandtabs(...)
S.expandtabs([tabsize]) -> unicode
 
Return a copy of S where all tab characters are expanded using spaces.
If tabsize is not given, a tab size of 8 characters is assumed.
find(...)
S.find(sub [,start [,end]]) -> int
 
Return the lowest index in S where substring sub is found,
such that sub is contained within s[start,end].  Optional
arguments start and end are interpreted as in slice notation.
 
Return -1 on failure.
index(...)
S.index(sub [,start [,end]]) -> int
 
Like S.find() but raise ValueError when the substring is not found.
isalnum(...)
S.isalnum() -> bool
 
Return True if all characters in S are alphanumeric
and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
isalpha(...)
S.isalpha() -> bool
 
Return True if all characters in S are alphabetic
and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
isdecimal(...)
S.isdecimal() -> bool
 
Return True if there are only decimal characters in S,
False otherwise.
isdigit(...)
S.isdigit() -> bool
 
Return True if all characters in S are digits
and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
islower(...)
S.islower() -> bool
 
Return True if all cased characters in S are lowercase and there is
at least one cased character in S, False otherwise.
isnumeric(...)
S.isnumeric() -> bool
 
Return True if there are only numeric characters in S,
False otherwise.
isspace(...)
S.isspace() -> bool
 
Return True if all characters in S are whitespace
and there is at least one character in S, False otherwise.
istitle(...)
S.istitle() -> bool
 
Return True if S is a titlecased string and there is at least one
character in S, i.e. upper- and titlecase characters may only
follow uncased characters and lowercase characters only cased ones.
Return False otherwise.
isupper(...)
S.isupper() -> bool
 
Return True if all cased characters in S are uppercase and there is
at least one cased character in S, False otherwise.
join(...)
S.join(sequence) -> unicode
 
Return a string which is the concatenation of the strings in the
sequence.  The separator between elements is S.
ljust(...)
S.ljust(width[, fillchar]) -> int
 
Return S left justified in a Unicode string of length width. Padding is
done using the specified fill character (default is a space).
lower(...)
S.lower() -> unicode
 
Return a copy of the string S converted to lowercase.
lstrip(...)
S.lstrip([chars]) -> unicode
 
Return a copy of the string S with leading whitespace removed.
If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
If chars is a str, it will be converted to unicode before stripping
partition(...)
S.partition(sep) -> (head, sep, tail)
 
Searches for the separator sep in S, and returns the part before it,
the separator itself, and the part after it.  If the separator is not
found, returns S and two empty strings.
replace(...)
S.replace (old, new[, maxsplit]) -> unicode
 
Return a copy of S with all occurrences of substring
old replaced by new.  If the optional argument maxsplit is
given, only the first maxsplit occurrences are replaced.
rfind(...)
S.rfind(sub [,start [,end]]) -> int
 
Return the highest index in S where substring sub is found,
such that sub is contained within s[start,end].  Optional
arguments start and end are interpreted as in slice notation.
 
Return -1 on failure.
rindex(...)
S.rindex(sub [,start [,end]]) -> int
 
Like S.rfind() but raise ValueError when the substring is not found.
rjust(...)
S.rjust(width[, fillchar]) -> unicode
 
Return S right justified in a Unicode string of length width. Padding is
done using the specified fill character (default is a space).
rpartition(...)
S.rpartition(sep) -> (tail, sep, head)
 
Searches for the separator sep in S, starting at the end of S, and returns
the part before it, the separator itself, and the part after it.  If the
separator is not found, returns two empty strings and S.
rsplit(...)
S.rsplit([sep [,maxsplit]]) -> list of strings
 
Return a list of the words in S, using sep as the
delimiter string, starting at the end of the string and
working to the front.  If maxsplit is given, at most maxsplit
splits are done. If sep is not specified, any whitespace string
is a separator.
rstrip(...)
S.rstrip([chars]) -> unicode
 
Return a copy of the string S with trailing whitespace removed.
If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
If chars is a str, it will be converted to unicode before stripping
split(...)
S.split([sep [,maxsplit]]) -> list of strings
 
Return a list of the words in S, using sep as the
delimiter string.  If maxsplit is given, at most maxsplit
splits are done. If sep is not specified or is None,
any whitespace string is a separator.
splitlines(...)
S.splitlines([keepends]]) -> list of strings
 
Return a list of the lines in S, breaking at line boundaries.
Line breaks are not included in the resulting list unless keepends
is given and true.
startswith(...)
S.startswith(prefix[, start[, end]]) -> bool
 
Return True if S starts with the specified prefix, False otherwise.
With optional start, test S beginning at that position.
With optional end, stop comparing S at that position.
prefix can also be a tuple of strings to try.
strip(...)
S.strip([chars]) -> unicode
 
Return a copy of the string S with leading and trailing
whitespace removed.
If chars is given and not None, remove characters in chars instead.
If chars is a str, it will be converted to unicode before stripping
swapcase(...)
S.swapcase() -> unicode
 
Return a copy of S with uppercase characters converted to lowercase
and vice versa.
title(...)
S.title() -> unicode
 
Return a titlecased version of S, i.e. words start with title case
characters, all remaining cased characters have lower case.
translate(...)
S.translate(table) -> unicode
 
Return a copy of the string S, where all characters have been mapped
through the given translation table, which must be a mapping of
Unicode ordinals to Unicode ordinals, Unicode strings or None.
Unmapped characters are left untouched. Characters mapped to None
are deleted.
upper(...)
S.upper() -> unicode
 
Return a copy of S converted to uppercase.
zfill(...)
S.zfill(width) -> unicode
 
Pad a numeric string x with zeros on the left, to fill a field
of the specified width. The string x is never truncated.

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8133360>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
class xrange(object)
    xrange([start,] stop[, step]) -> xrange object
 
Like range(), but instead of returning a list, returns an object that
generates the numbers in the range on demand.  For looping, this is 
slightly faster than range() and more memory efficient.
 
  Methods defined here:
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__iter__(...)
x.__iter__() <==> iter(x)
__len__(...)
x.__len__() <==> len(x)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__reversed__(...)
Returns a reverse iterator.

Data and other attributes defined here:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x814ac60>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

 
Functions
       
__import__(...)
__import__(name, globals={}, locals={}, fromlist=[], level=-1) -> module
 
Import a module.  The globals are only used to determine the context;
they are not modified.  The locals are currently unused.  The fromlist
should be a list of names to emulate ``from name import ...'', or an
empty list to emulate ``import name''.
When importing a module from a package, note that __import__('A.B', ...)
returns package A when fromlist is empty, but its submodule B when
fromlist is not empty.  Level is used to determine whether to perform 
absolute or relative imports.  -1 is the original strategy of attempting
both absolute and relative imports, 0 is absolute, a positive number
is the number of parent directories to search relative to the current module.
abs(...)
abs(number) -> number
 
Return the absolute value of the argument.
all(...)
all(iterable) -> bool
 
Return True if bool(x) is True for all values x in the iterable.
any(...)
any(iterable) -> bool
 
Return True if bool(x) is True for any x in the iterable.
apply(...)
apply(object[, args[, kwargs]]) -> value
 
Call a callable object with positional arguments taken from the tuple args,
and keyword arguments taken from the optional dictionary kwargs.
Note that classes are callable, as are instances with a __call__() method.
 
Deprecated since release 2.3. Instead, use the extended call syntax:
    function(*args, **keywords).
callable(...)
callable(object) -> bool
 
Return whether the object is callable (i.e., some kind of function).
Note that classes are callable, as are instances with a __call__() method.
chr(...)
chr(i) -> character
 
Return a string of one character with ordinal i; 0 <= i < 256.
cmp(...)
cmp(x, y) -> integer
 
Return negative if x<y, zero if x==y, positive if x>y.
coerce(...)
coerce(x, y) -> (x1, y1)
 
Return a tuple consisting of the two numeric arguments converted to
a common type, using the same rules as used by arithmetic operations.
If coercion is not possible, raise TypeError.
compile(...)
compile(source, filename, mode[, flags[, dont_inherit]]) -> code object
 
Compile the source string (a Python module, statement or expression)
into a code object that can be executed by the exec statement or eval().
The filename will be used for run-time error messages.
The mode must be 'exec' to compile a module, 'single' to compile a
single (interactive) statement, or 'eval' to compile an expression.
The flags argument, if present, controls which future statements influence
the compilation of the code.
The dont_inherit argument, if non-zero, stops the compilation inheriting
the effects of any future statements in effect in the code calling
compile; if absent or zero these statements do influence the compilation,
in addition to any features explicitly specified.
delattr(...)
delattr(object, name)
 
Delete a named attribute on an objectdelattr(x, 'y') is equivalent to
``del x.y''.
dir(...)
dir([object]) -> list of strings
 
Return an alphabetized list of names comprising (some of) the attributes
of the given object, and of attributes reachable from it:
 
No argument:  the names in the current scope.
Module object:  the module attributes.
Type or class object:  its attributes, and recursively the attributes of
    its bases.
Otherwise:  its attributes, its class's attributes, and recursively the
    attributes of its class's base classes.
divmod(...)
divmod(x, y) -> (div, mod)
 
Return the tuple ((x-x%y)/y, x%y).  Invariant: div*y + mod == x.
eval(...)
eval(source[, globals[, locals]]) -> value
 
Evaluate the source in the context of globals and locals.
The source may be a string representing a Python expression
or a code object as returned by compile().
The globals must be a dictionary and locals can be any mapping,
defaulting to the current globals and locals.
If only globals is given, locals defaults to it.
execfile(...)
execfile(filename[, globals[, locals]])
 
Read and execute a Python script from a file.
The globals and locals are dictionaries, defaulting to the current
globals and locals.  If only globals is given, locals defaults to it.
filter(...)
filter(function or None, sequence) -> listtuple, or string
 
Return those items of sequence for which function(item) is true.  If
function is None, return the items that are true.  If sequence is a tuple
or string, return the same type, else return a list.
getattr(...)
getattr(object, name[, default]) -> value
 
Get a named attribute from an objectgetattr(x, 'y') is equivalent to x.y.
When a default argument is given, it is returned when the attribute doesn't
exist; without it, an exception is raised in that case.
globals(...)
globals() -> dictionary
 
Return the dictionary containing the current scope's global variables.
hasattr(...)
hasattr(object, name) -> bool
 
Return whether the object has an attribute with the given name.
(This is done by calling getattr(object, name) and catching exceptions.)
hash(...)
hash(object) -> integer
 
Return a hash value for the object.  Two objects with the same value have
the same hash value.  The reverse is not necessarily true, but likely.
hex(...)
hex(number) -> string
 
Return the hexadecimal representation of an integer or long integer.
id(...)
id(object) -> integer
 
Return the identity of an object.  This is guaranteed to be unique among
simultaneously existing objects.  (Hint: it's the object's memory address.)
input(...)
input([prompt]) -> value
 
Equivalent to eval(raw_input(prompt)).
intern(...)
intern(string) -> string
 
``Intern'' the given string.  This enters the string in the (global)
table of interned strings whose purpose is to speed up dictionary lookups.
Return the string itself or the previously interned string object with the
same value.
isinstance(...)
isinstance(object, class-or-type-or-tuple) -> bool
 
Return whether an object is an instance of a class or of a subclass thereof.
With a type as second argument, return whether that is the object's type.
The form using a tupleisinstance(x, (A, B, ...)), is a shortcut for
isinstance(x, A) or isinstance(x, B) or ... (etc.).
issubclass(...)
issubclass(C, B) -> bool
 
Return whether class C is a subclass (i.e., a derived class) of class B.
When using a tuple as the second argument issubclass(X, (A, B, ...)),
is a shortcut for issubclass(X, A) or issubclass(X, B) or ... (etc.).
iter(...)
iter(collection) -> iterator
iter(callable, sentinel) -> iterator
 
Get an iterator from an object.  In the first form, the argument must
supply its own iterator, or be a sequence.
In the second form, the callable is called until it returns the sentinel.
len(...)
len(object) -> integer
 
Return the number of items of a sequence or mapping.
locals(...)
locals() -> dictionary
 
Update and return a dictionary containing the current scope's local variables.
map(...)
map(function, sequence[, sequence, ...]) -> list
 
Return a list of the results of applying the function to the items of
the argument sequence(s).  If more than one sequence is given, the
function is called with an argument list consisting of the corresponding
item of each sequence, substituting None for missing values when not all
sequences have the same length.  If the function is None, return a list of
the items of the sequence (or a list of tuples if more than one sequence).
max(...)
max(iterable[, key=func]) -> value
max(a, b, c, ...[, key=func]) -> value
 
With a single iterable argument, return its largest item.
With two or more arguments, return the largest argument.
min(...)
min(iterable[, key=func]) -> value
min(a, b, c, ...[, key=func]) -> value
 
With a single iterable argument, return its smallest item.
With two or more arguments, return the smallest argument.
oct(...)
oct(number) -> string
 
Return the octal representation of an integer or long integer.
open(...)
open(name[, mode[, buffering]]) -> file object
 
Open a file using the file() type, returns a file object.
ord(...)
ord(c) -> integer
 
Return the integer ordinal of a one-character string.
pow(...)
pow(x, y[, z]) -> number
 
With two arguments, equivalent to x**y.  With three arguments,
equivalent to (x**y) % z, but may be more efficient (e.g. for longs).
range(...)
range([start,] stop[, step]) -> list of integers
 
Return a list containing an arithmetic progression of integers.
range(i, j) returns [i, i+1, i+2, ..., j-1]; start (!) defaults to 0.
When step is given, it specifies the increment (or decrement).
For example, range(4) returns [0, 1, 2, 3].  The end point is omitted!
These are exactly the valid indices for a list of 4 elements.
raw_input(...)
raw_input([prompt]) -> string
 
Read a string from standard input.  The trailing newline is stripped.
If the user hits EOF (Unix: Ctl-D, Windows: Ctl-Z+Return), raise EOFError.
On Unix, GNU readline is used if enabled.  The prompt string, if given,
is printed without a trailing newline before reading.
reduce(...)
reduce(function, sequence[, initial]) -> value
 
Apply a function of two arguments cumulatively to the items of a sequence,
from left to right, so as to reduce the sequence to a single value.
For example, reduce(lambda x, y: x+y, [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) calculates
((((1+2)+3)+4)+5).  If initial is present, it is placed before the items
of the sequence in the calculation, and serves as a default when the
sequence is empty.
reload(...)
reload(module) -> module
 
Reload the module.  The module must have been successfully imported before.
repr(...)
repr(object) -> string
 
Return the canonical string representation of the object.
For most object types, eval(repr(object)) == object.
round(...)
round(number[, ndigits]) -> floating point number
 
Round a number to a given precision in decimal digits (default 0 digits).
This always returns a floating point number.  Precision may be negative.
setattr(...)
setattr(object, name, value)
 
Set a named attribute on an objectsetattr(x, 'y', v) is equivalent to
``x.y = v''.
sorted(...)
sorted(iterable, cmp=None, key=None, reverse=False) --> new sorted list
sum(...)
sum(sequence, start=0) -> value
 
Returns the sum of a sequence of numbers (NOT strings) plus the value
of parameter 'start'.  When the sequence is empty, returns start.
unichr(...)
unichr(i) -> Unicode character
 
Return a Unicode string of one character with ordinal i; 0 <= i <= 0x10ffff.
vars(...)
vars([object]) -> dictionary
 
Without arguments, equivalent to locals().
With an argument, equivalent to object.__dict__.
zip(...)
zip(seq1 [, seq2 [...]]) -> [(seq1[0], seq2[0] ...), (...)]
 
Return a list of tuples, where each tuple contains the i-th element
from each of the argument sequences.  The returned list is truncated
in length to the length of the shortest argument sequence.

 
Data
        Ellipsis = Ellipsis
False = False
None = None
NotImplemented = NotImplemented
True = True
__debug__ = True
copyright = Copyright (c) 2001-2007 Python Software Foundati...ematisch Centrum, Amsterdam. All Rights Reserved.
credits = Thanks to CWI, CNRI, BeOpen.com, Zope Corpor...opment. See www.python.org for more information.
exit = Use exit() or Ctrl-D (i.e. EOF) to exit
help = Type help() for interactive help, or help(object) for help about object.
license = Type license() to see the full license text
quit = Use quit() or Ctrl-D (i.e. EOF) to exit