doctest
index
/usr/local/lib/python2.5/doctest.py
Module Docs

Module doctest -- a framework for running examples in docstrings.
 
In simplest use, end each module M to be tested with:
 
def _test():
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()
 
if __name__ == "__main__":
    _test()
 
Then running the module as a script will cause the examples in the
docstrings to get executed and verified:
 
python M.py
 
This won't display anything unless an example fails, in which case the
failing example(s) and the cause(s) of the failure(s) are printed to stdout
(why not stderr? because stderr is a lame hack <0.2 wink>), and the final
line of output is "Test failed.".
 
Run it with the -v switch instead:
 
python M.py -v
 
and a detailed report of all examples tried is printed to stdout, along
with assorted summaries at the end.
 
You can force verbose mode by passing "verbose=True" to testmod, or prohibit
it by passing "verbose=False".  In either of those cases, sys.argv is not
examined by testmod.
 
There are a variety of other ways to run doctests, including integration
with the unittest framework, and support for running non-Python text
files containing doctests.  There are also many ways to override parts
of doctest's default behaviors.  See the Library Reference Manual for
details.

 
Modules
       
__future__
difflib
inspect
linecache
os
pdb
re
sys
tempfile
traceback
unittest
warnings

 
Classes
       
DocTest
DocTestFinder
DocTestParser
DocTestRunner
DebugRunner
Example
OutputChecker
Tester
exceptions.Exception(exceptions.BaseException)
DocTestFailure
UnexpectedException

 
class DebugRunner(DocTestRunner)
    Run doc tests but raise an exception as soon as there is a failure.
 
If an unexpected exception occurs, an UnexpectedException is raised.
It contains the test, the example, and the original exception:
 
  >>> runner = DebugRunner(verbose=False)
  >>> test = DocTestParser().get_doctest('>>> raise KeyError\n42',
  ...                                    {}, 'foo', 'foo.py', 0)
  >>> try:
  ...     runner.run(test)
  ... except UnexpectedException, failure:
  ...     pass
 
  >>> failure.test is test
  True
 
  >>> failure.example.want
  '42\n'
 
  >>> exc_info = failure.exc_info
  >>> raise exc_info[0], exc_info[1], exc_info[2]
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ...
  KeyError
 
We wrap the original exception to give the calling application
access to the test and example information.
 
If the output doesn't match, then a DocTestFailure is raised:
 
  >>> test = DocTestParser().get_doctest('''
  ...      >>> x = 1
  ...      >>> x
  ...      2
  ...      ''', {}, 'foo', 'foo.py', 0)
 
  >>> try:
  ...    runner.run(test)
  ... except DocTestFailure, failure:
  ...    pass
 
DocTestFailure objects provide access to the test:
 
  >>> failure.test is test
  True
 
As well as to the example:
 
  >>> failure.example.want
  '2\n'
 
and the actual output:
 
  >>> failure.got
  '1\n'
 
If a failure or error occurs, the globals are left intact:
 
  >>> del test.globs['__builtins__']
  >>> test.globs
  {'x': 1}
 
  >>> test = DocTestParser().get_doctest('''
  ...      >>> x = 2
  ...      >>> raise KeyError
  ...      ''', {}, 'foo', 'foo.py', 0)
 
  >>> runner.run(test)
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ...
  UnexpectedException: <DocTest foo from foo.py:0 (2 examples)>
 
  >>> del test.globs['__builtins__']
  >>> test.globs
  {'x': 2}
 
But the globals are cleared if there is no error:
 
  >>> test = DocTestParser().get_doctest('''
  ...      >>> x = 2
  ...      ''', {}, 'foo', 'foo.py', 0)
 
  >>> runner.run(test)
  (0, 1)
 
  >>> test.globs
  {}
 
  Methods defined here:
report_failure(self, out, test, example, got)
report_unexpected_exception(self, out, test, example, exc_info)
run(self, test, compileflags=None, out=None, clear_globs=True)

Methods inherited from DocTestRunner:
__init__(self, checker=None, verbose=None, optionflags=0)
Create a new test runner.
 
Optional keyword arg `checker` is the `OutputChecker` that
should be used to compare the expected outputs and actual
outputs of doctest examples.
 
Optional keyword arg 'verbose' prints lots of stuff if true,
only failures if false; by default, it's true iff '-v' is in
sys.argv.
 
Optional argument `optionflags` can be used to control how the
test runner compares expected output to actual output, and how
it displays failures.  See the documentation for `testmod` for
more information.
merge(self, other)
#/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
# Backward compatibility cruft to maintain doctest.master.
#/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
report_start(self, out, test, example)
Report that the test runner is about to process the given
example.  (Only displays a message if verbose=True)
report_success(self, out, test, example, got)
Report that the given example ran successfully.  (Only
displays a message if verbose=True)
summarize(self, verbose=None)
Print a summary of all the test cases that have been run by
this DocTestRunner, and return a tuple `(f, t)`, where `f` is
the total number of failed examples, and `t` is the total
number of tried examples.
 
The optional `verbose` argument controls how detailed the
summary is.  If the verbosity is not specified, then the
DocTestRunner's verbosity is used.

Data and other attributes inherited from DocTestRunner:
DIVIDER = '**********************************************************************'

 
class DocTest
    A collection of doctest examples that should be run in a single
namespace.  Each `DocTest` defines the following attributes:
 
  - examples: the list of examples.
 
  - globs: The namespace (aka globals) that the examples should
    be run in.
 
  - name: A name identifying the DocTest (typically, the name of
    the object whose docstring this DocTest was extracted from).
 
  - filename: The name of the file that this DocTest was extracted
    from, or `None` if the filename is unknown.
 
  - lineno: The line number within filename where this DocTest
    begins, or `None` if the line number is unavailable.  This
    line number is zero-based, with respect to the beginning of
    the file.
 
  - docstring: The string that the examples were extracted from,
    or `None` if the string is unavailable.
 
  Methods defined here:
__cmp__(self, other)
# This lets us sort tests by name:
__init__(self, examples, globs, name, filename, lineno, docstring)
Create a new DocTest containing the given examples.  The
DocTest's globals are initialized with a copy of `globs`.
__repr__(self)

 
class DocTestFailure(exceptions.Exception)
    DocTest example has failed in debugging mode.
 
The exception instance has variables:
 
- test: the DocTest object being run
 
- example: the Example object that failed
 
- got: the actual output
 
 
Method resolution order:
DocTestFailure
exceptions.Exception
exceptions.BaseException
__builtin__.object

Methods defined here:
__init__(self, test, example, got)
__str__(self)

Data descriptors defined here:
__weakref__
list of weak references to the object (if defined)

Data and other attributes inherited from exceptions.Exception:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8125440>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

Methods inherited from exceptions.BaseException:
__delattr__(...)
x.__delattr__('name') <==> del x.name
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__getslice__(...)
x.__getslice__(i, j) <==> x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__reduce__(...)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__setattr__(...)
x.__setattr__('name', value) <==> x.name = value
__setstate__(...)

Data descriptors inherited from exceptions.BaseException:
__dict__
args
message
exception message

 
class DocTestFinder
    A class used to extract the DocTests that are relevant to a given
object, from its docstring and the docstrings of its contained
objects.  Doctests can currently be extracted from the following
object types: modules, functions, classes, methods, staticmethods,
classmethods, and properties.
 
  Methods defined here:
__init__(self, verbose=False, parser=<doctest.DocTestParser instance at 0xb6c523ec>, recurse=True, exclude_empty=True)
Create a new doctest finder.
 
The optional argument `parser` specifies a class or
function that should be used to create new DocTest objects (or
objects that implement the same interface as DocTest).  The
signature for this factory function should match the signature
of the DocTest constructor.
 
If the optional argument `recurse` is false, then `find` will
only examine the given object, and not any contained objects.
 
If the optional argument `exclude_empty` is false, then `find`
will include tests for objects with empty docstrings.
find(self, obj, name=None, module=None, globs=None, extraglobs=None)
Return a list of the DocTests that are defined by the given
object's docstring, or by any of its contained objects'
docstrings.
 
The optional parameter `module` is the module that contains
the given object.  If the module is not specified or is None, then
the test finder will attempt to automatically determine the
correct module.  The object's module is used:
 
    - As a default namespace, if `globs` is not specified.
    - To prevent the DocTestFinder from extracting DocTests
      from objects that are imported from other modules.
    - To find the name of the file containing the object.
    - To help find the line number of the object within its
      file.
 
Contained objects whose module does not match `module` are ignored.
 
If `module` is False, no attempt to find the module will be made.
This is obscure, of use mostly in tests:  if `module` is False, or
is None but cannot be found automatically, then all objects are
considered to belong to the (non-existent) module, so all contained
objects will (recursively) be searched for doctests.
 
The globals for each DocTest is formed by combining `globs`
and `extraglobs` (bindings in `extraglobs` override bindings
in `globs`).  A new copy of the globals dictionary is created
for each DocTest.  If `globs` is not specified, then it
defaults to the module's `__dict__`, if specified, or {}
otherwise.  If `extraglobs` is not specified, then it defaults
to {}.

 
class DocTestParser
    A class used to parse strings containing doctest examples.
 
  Methods defined here:
get_doctest(self, string, globs, name, filename, lineno)
Extract all doctest examples from the given string, and
collect them into a `DocTest` object.
 
`globs`, `name`, `filename`, and `lineno` are attributes for
the new `DocTest` object.  See the documentation for `DocTest`
for more information.
get_examples(self, string, name='<string>')
Extract all doctest examples from the given string, and return
them as a list of `Example` objects.  Line numbers are
0-based, because it's most common in doctests that nothing
interesting appears on the same line as opening triple-quote,
and so the first interesting line is called "line 1" then.
 
The optional argument `name` is a name identifying this
string, and is only used for error messages.
parse(self, string, name='<string>')
Divide the given string into examples and intervening text,
and return them as a list of alternating Examples and strings.
Line numbers for the Examples are 0-based.  The optional
argument `name` is a name identifying this string, and is only
used for error messages.

 
class DocTestRunner
    A class used to run DocTest test cases, and accumulate statistics.
The `run` method is used to process a single DocTest case.  It
returns a tuple `(f, t)`, where `t` is the number of test cases
tried, and `f` is the number of test cases that failed.
 
    >>> tests = DocTestFinder().find(_TestClass)
    >>> runner = DocTestRunner(verbose=False)
    >>> tests.sort(key = lambda test: test.name)
    >>> for test in tests:
    ...     print test.name, '->', runner.run(test)
    _TestClass -> (0, 2)
    _TestClass.__init__ -> (0, 2)
    _TestClass.get -> (0, 2)
    _TestClass.square -> (0, 1)
 
The `summarize` method prints a summary of all the test cases that
have been run by the runner, and returns an aggregated `(f, t)`
tuple:
 
    >>> runner.summarize(verbose=1)
    4 items passed all tests:
       2 tests in _TestClass
       2 tests in _TestClass.__init__
       2 tests in _TestClass.get
       1 tests in _TestClass.square
    7 tests in 4 items.
    7 passed and 0 failed.
    Test passed.
    (0, 7)
 
The aggregated number of tried examples and failed examples is
also available via the `tries` and `failures` attributes:
 
    >>> runner.tries
    7
    >>> runner.failures
    0
 
The comparison between expected outputs and actual outputs is done
by an `OutputChecker`.  This comparison may be customized with a
number of option flags; see the documentation for `testmod` for
more information.  If the option flags are insufficient, then the
comparison may also be customized by passing a subclass of
`OutputChecker` to the constructor.
 
The test runner's display output can be controlled in two ways.
First, an output function (`out) can be passed to
`TestRunner.run`; this function will be called with strings that
should be displayed.  It defaults to `sys.stdout.write`.  If
capturing the output is not sufficient, then the display output
can be also customized by subclassing DocTestRunner, and
overriding the methods `report_start`, `report_success`,
`report_unexpected_exception`, and `report_failure`.
 
  Methods defined here:
__init__(self, checker=None, verbose=None, optionflags=0)
Create a new test runner.
 
Optional keyword arg `checker` is the `OutputChecker` that
should be used to compare the expected outputs and actual
outputs of doctest examples.
 
Optional keyword arg 'verbose' prints lots of stuff if true,
only failures if false; by default, it's true iff '-v' is in
sys.argv.
 
Optional argument `optionflags` can be used to control how the
test runner compares expected output to actual output, and how
it displays failures.  See the documentation for `testmod` for
more information.
merge(self, other)
#/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
# Backward compatibility cruft to maintain doctest.master.
#/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
report_failure(self, out, test, example, got)
Report that the given example failed.
report_start(self, out, test, example)
Report that the test runner is about to process the given
example.  (Only displays a message if verbose=True)
report_success(self, out, test, example, got)
Report that the given example ran successfully.  (Only
displays a message if verbose=True)
report_unexpected_exception(self, out, test, example, exc_info)
Report that the given example raised an unexpected exception.
run(self, test, compileflags=None, out=None, clear_globs=True)
Run the examples in `test`, and display the results using the
writer function `out`.
 
The examples are run in the namespace `test.globs`.  If
`clear_globs` is true (the default), then this namespace will
be cleared after the test runs, to help with garbage
collection.  If you would like to examine the namespace after
the test completes, then use `clear_globs=False`.
 
`compileflags` gives the set of flags that should be used by
the Python compiler when running the examples.  If not
specified, then it will default to the set of future-import
flags that apply to `globs`.
 
The output of each example is checked using
`DocTestRunner.check_output`, and the results are formatted by
the `DocTestRunner.report_*` methods.
summarize(self, verbose=None)
Print a summary of all the test cases that have been run by
this DocTestRunner, and return a tuple `(f, t)`, where `f` is
the total number of failed examples, and `t` is the total
number of tried examples.
 
The optional `verbose` argument controls how detailed the
summary is.  If the verbosity is not specified, then the
DocTestRunner's verbosity is used.

Data and other attributes defined here:
DIVIDER = '**********************************************************************'

 
class Example
    A single doctest example, consisting of source code and expected
output.  `Example` defines the following attributes:
 
  - source: A single Python statement, always ending with a newline.
    The constructor adds a newline if needed.
 
  - want: The expected output from running the source code (either
    from stdout, or a traceback in case of exception).  `want` ends
    with a newline unless it's empty, in which case it's an empty
    string.  The constructor adds a newline if needed.
 
  - exc_msg: The exception message generated by the example, if
    the example is expected to generate an exception; or `None` if
    it is not expected to generate an exception.  This exception
    message is compared against the return value of
    `traceback.format_exception_only()`.  `exc_msg` ends with a
    newline unless it's `None`.  The constructor adds a newline
    if needed.
 
  - lineno: The line number within the DocTest string containing
    this Example where the Example begins.  This line number is
    zero-based, with respect to the beginning of the DocTest.
 
  - indent: The example's indentation in the DocTest string.
    I.e., the number of space characters that preceed the
    example's first prompt.
 
  - options: A dictionary mapping from option flags to True or
    False, which is used to override default options for this
    example.  Any option flags not contained in this dictionary
    are left at their default value (as specified by the
    DocTestRunner's optionflags).  By default, no options are set.
 
  Methods defined here:
__init__(self, source, want, exc_msg=None, lineno=0, indent=0, options=None)

 
class OutputChecker
    A class used to check the whether the actual output from a doctest
example matches the expected output.  `OutputChecker` defines two
methods: `check_output`, which compares a given pair of outputs,
and returns true if they match; and `output_difference`, which
returns a string describing the differences between two outputs.
 
  Methods defined here:
check_output(self, want, got, optionflags)
Return True iff the actual output from an example (`got`)
matches the expected output (`want`).  These strings are
always considered to match if they are identical; but
depending on what option flags the test runner is using,
several non-exact match types are also possible.  See the
documentation for `TestRunner` for more information about
option flags.
output_difference(self, example, got, optionflags)
Return a string describing the differences between the
expected output for a given example (`example`) and the actual
output (`got`).  `optionflags` is the set of option flags used
to compare `want` and `got`.

 
class Tester
     Methods defined here:
__init__(self, mod=None, globs=None, verbose=None, optionflags=0)
merge(self, other)
run__test__(self, d, name)
rundict(self, d, name, module=None)
rundoc(self, object, name=None, module=None)
runstring(self, s, name)
summarize(self, verbose=None)

 
class UnexpectedException(exceptions.Exception)
    DocTest example has encountered an unexpected exception
 
The exception instance has variables:
 
- test: the DocTest object being run
 
- example: the Example object that failed
 
- exc_info: the exception info
 
 
Method resolution order:
UnexpectedException
exceptions.Exception
exceptions.BaseException
__builtin__.object

Methods defined here:
__init__(self, test, example, exc_info)
__str__(self)

Data descriptors defined here:
__weakref__
list of weak references to the object (if defined)

Data and other attributes inherited from exceptions.Exception:
__new__ = <built-in method __new__ of type object at 0x8125440>
T.__new__(S, ...) -> a new object with type S, a subtype of T

Methods inherited from exceptions.BaseException:
__delattr__(...)
x.__delattr__('name') <==> del x.name
__getattribute__(...)
x.__getattribute__('name') <==> x.name
__getitem__(...)
x.__getitem__(y) <==> x[y]
__getslice__(...)
x.__getslice__(i, j) <==> x[i:j]
 
Use of negative indices is not supported.
__reduce__(...)
__repr__(...)
x.__repr__() <==> repr(x)
__setattr__(...)
x.__setattr__('name', value) <==> x.name = value
__setstate__(...)

Data descriptors inherited from exceptions.BaseException:
__dict__
args
message
exception message

 
Functions
       
DocFileSuite(*paths, **kw)
A unittest suite for one or more doctest files.
 
The path to each doctest file is given as a string; the
interpretation of that string depends on the keyword argument
"module_relative".
 
A number of options may be provided as keyword arguments:
 
module_relative
  If "module_relative" is True, then the given file paths are
  interpreted as os-independent module-relative paths.  By
  default, these paths are relative to the calling module's
  directory; but if the "package" argument is specified, then
  they are relative to that package.  To ensure os-independence,
  "filename" should use "/" characters to separate path
  segments, and may not be an absolute path (i.e., it may not
  begin with "/").
 
  If "module_relative" is False, then the given file paths are
  interpreted as os-specific paths.  These paths may be absolute
  or relative (to the current working directory).
 
package
  A Python package or the name of a Python package whose directory
  should be used as the base directory for module relative paths.
  If "package" is not specified, then the calling module's
  directory is used as the base directory for module relative
  filenames.  It is an error to specify "package" if
  "module_relative" is False.
 
setUp
  A set-up function.  This is called before running the
  tests in each file. The setUp function will be passed a DocTest
  object.  The setUp function can access the test globals as the
  globs attribute of the test passed.
 
tearDown
  A tear-down function.  This is called after running the
  tests in each file.  The tearDown function will be passed a DocTest
  object.  The tearDown function can access the test globals as the
  globs attribute of the test passed.
 
globs
  A dictionary containing initial global variables for the tests.
 
optionflags
  A set of doctest option flags expressed as an integer.
 
parser
  A DocTestParser (or subclass) that should be used to extract
  tests from the files.
 
encoding
  An encoding that will be used to convert the files to unicode.
DocTestSuite(module=None, globs=None, extraglobs=None, test_finder=None, **options)
Convert doctest tests for a module to a unittest test suite.
 
This converts each documentation string in a module that
contains doctest tests to a unittest test case.  If any of the
tests in a doc string fail, then the test case fails.  An exception
is raised showing the name of the file containing the test and a
(sometimes approximate) line number.
 
The `module` argument provides the module to be tested.  The argument
can be either a module or a module name.
 
If no argument is given, the calling module is used.
 
A number of options may be provided as keyword arguments:
 
setUp
  A set-up function.  This is called before running the
  tests in each file. The setUp function will be passed a DocTest
  object.  The setUp function can access the test globals as the
  globs attribute of the test passed.
 
tearDown
  A tear-down function.  This is called after running the
  tests in each file.  The tearDown function will be passed a DocTest
  object.  The tearDown function can access the test globals as the
  globs attribute of the test passed.
 
globs
  A dictionary containing initial global variables for the tests.
 
optionflags
   A set of doctest option flags expressed as an integer.
debug(module, name, pm=False)
Debug a single doctest docstring.
 
Provide the module (or dotted name of the module) containing the
test to be debugged and the name (within the module) of the object
with the docstring with tests to be debugged.
debug_src(src, pm=False, globs=None)
Debug a single doctest docstring, in argument `src`'
register_optionflag(name)
run_docstring_examples(f, globs, verbose=False, name='NoName', compileflags=None, optionflags=0)
Test examples in the given object's docstring (`f`), using `globs`
as globals.  Optional argument `name` is used in failure messages.
If the optional argument `verbose` is true, then generate output
even if there are no failures.
 
`compileflags` gives the set of flags that should be used by the
Python compiler when running the examples.  If not specified, then
it will default to the set of future-import flags that apply to
`globs`.
 
Optional keyword arg `optionflags` specifies options for the
testing and output.  See the documentation for `testmod` for more
information.
script_from_examples(s)
Extract script from text with examples.
 
Converts text with examples to a Python script.  Example input is
converted to regular code.  Example output and all other words
are converted to comments:
 
>>> text = '''
...       Here are examples of simple math.
...
...           Python has super accurate integer addition
...
...           >>> 2 + 2
...           5
...
...           And very friendly error messages:
...
...           >>> 1/0
...           To Infinity
...           And
...           Beyond
...
...           You can use logic if you want:
...
...           >>> if 0:
...           ...    blah
...           ...    blah
...           ...
...
...           Ho hum
...           '''
 
>>> print script_from_examples(text)
# Here are examples of simple math.
#
#     Python has super accurate integer addition
#
2 + 2
# Expected:
## 5
#
#     And very friendly error messages:
#
1/0
# Expected:
## To Infinity
## And
## Beyond
#
#     You can use logic if you want:
#
if 0:
   blah
   blah
#
#     Ho hum
<BLANKLINE>
set_unittest_reportflags(flags)
Sets the unittest option flags.
 
The old flag is returned so that a runner could restore the old
value if it wished to:
 
  >>> import doctest
  >>> old = doctest._unittest_reportflags
  >>> doctest.set_unittest_reportflags(REPORT_NDIFF |
  ...                          REPORT_ONLY_FIRST_FAILURE) == old
  True
 
  >>> doctest._unittest_reportflags == (REPORT_NDIFF |
  ...                                   REPORT_ONLY_FIRST_FAILURE)
  True
 
Only reporting flags can be set:
 
  >>> doctest.set_unittest_reportflags(ELLIPSIS)
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ...
  ValueError: ('Only reporting flags allowed', 8)
 
  >>> doctest.set_unittest_reportflags(old) == (REPORT_NDIFF |
  ...                                   REPORT_ONLY_FIRST_FAILURE)
  True
testfile(filename, module_relative=True, name=None, package=None, globs=None, verbose=None, report=True, optionflags=0, extraglobs=None, raise_on_error=False, parser=<doctest.DocTestParser instance at 0xb6c5214c>, encoding=None)
Test examples in the given file.  Return (#failures, #tests).
 
Optional keyword arg "module_relative" specifies how filenames
should be interpreted:
 
  - If "module_relative" is True (the default), then "filename"
     specifies a module-relative path.  By default, this path is
     relative to the calling module's directory; but if the
     "package" argument is specified, then it is relative to that
     package.  To ensure os-independence, "filename" should use
     "/" characters to separate path segments, and should not
     be an absolute path (i.e., it may not begin with "/").
 
  - If "module_relative" is False, then "filename" specifies an
    os-specific path.  The path may be absolute or relative (to
    the current working directory).
 
Optional keyword arg "name" gives the name of the test; by default
use the file's basename.
 
Optional keyword argument "package" is a Python package or the
name of a Python package whose directory should be used as the
base directory for a module relative filename.  If no package is
specified, then the calling module's directory is used as the base
directory for module relative filenames.  It is an error to
specify "package" if "module_relative" is False.
 
Optional keyword arg "globs" gives a dict to be used as the globals
when executing examples; by default, use {}.  A copy of this dict
is actually used for each docstring, so that each docstring's
examples start with a clean slate.
 
Optional keyword arg "extraglobs" gives a dictionary that should be
merged into the globals that are used to execute examples.  By
default, no extra globals are used.
 
Optional keyword arg "verbose" prints lots of stuff if true, prints
only failures if false; by default, it's true iff "-v" is in sys.argv.
 
Optional keyword arg "report" prints a summary at the end when true,
else prints nothing at the end.  In verbose mode, the summary is
detailed, else very brief (in fact, empty if all tests passed).
 
Optional keyword arg "optionflags" or's together module constants,
and defaults to 0.  Possible values (see the docs for details):
 
    DONT_ACCEPT_TRUE_FOR_1
    DONT_ACCEPT_BLANKLINE
    NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
    ELLIPSIS
    SKIP
    IGNORE_EXCEPTION_DETAIL
    REPORT_UDIFF
    REPORT_CDIFF
    REPORT_NDIFF
    REPORT_ONLY_FIRST_FAILURE
 
Optional keyword arg "raise_on_error" raises an exception on the
first unexpected exception or failure. This allows failures to be
post-mortem debugged.
 
Optional keyword arg "parser" specifies a DocTestParser (or
subclass) that should be used to extract tests from the files.
 
Optional keyword arg "encoding" specifies an encoding that should
be used to convert the file to unicode.
 
Advanced tomfoolery:  testmod runs methods of a local instance of
class doctest.Tester, then merges the results into (or creates)
global Tester instance doctest.master.  Methods of doctest.master
can be called directly too, if you want to do something unusual.
Passing report=0 to testmod is especially useful then, to delay
displaying a summary.  Invoke doctest.master.summarize(verbose)
when you're done fiddling.
testmod(m=None, name=None, globs=None, verbose=None, report=True, optionflags=0, extraglobs=None, raise_on_error=False, exclude_empty=False)
m=None, name=None, globs=None, verbose=None, report=True,
   optionflags=0, extraglobs=None, raise_on_error=False,
   exclude_empty=False
 
Test examples in docstrings in functions and classes reachable
from module m (or the current module if m is not supplied), starting
with m.__doc__.
 
Also test examples reachable from dict m.__test__ if it exists and is
not None.  m.__test__ maps names to functions, classes and strings;
function and class docstrings are tested even if the name is private;
strings are tested directly, as if they were docstrings.
 
Return (#failures, #tests).
 
See doctest.__doc__ for an overview.
 
Optional keyword arg "name" gives the name of the module; by default
use m.__name__.
 
Optional keyword arg "globs" gives a dict to be used as the globals
when executing examples; by default, use m.__dict__.  A copy of this
dict is actually used for each docstring, so that each docstring's
examples start with a clean slate.
 
Optional keyword arg "extraglobs" gives a dictionary that should be
merged into the globals that are used to execute examples.  By
default, no extra globals are used.  This is new in 2.4.
 
Optional keyword arg "verbose" prints lots of stuff if true, prints
only failures if false; by default, it's true iff "-v" is in sys.argv.
 
Optional keyword arg "report" prints a summary at the end when true,
else prints nothing at the end.  In verbose mode, the summary is
detailed, else very brief (in fact, empty if all tests passed).
 
Optional keyword arg "optionflags" or's together module constants,
and defaults to 0.  This is new in 2.3.  Possible values (see the
docs for details):
 
    DONT_ACCEPT_TRUE_FOR_1
    DONT_ACCEPT_BLANKLINE
    NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
    ELLIPSIS
    SKIP
    IGNORE_EXCEPTION_DETAIL
    REPORT_UDIFF
    REPORT_CDIFF
    REPORT_NDIFF
    REPORT_ONLY_FIRST_FAILURE
 
Optional keyword arg "raise_on_error" raises an exception on the
first unexpected exception or failure. This allows failures to be
post-mortem debugged.
 
Advanced tomfoolery:  testmod runs methods of a local instance of
class doctest.Tester, then merges the results into (or creates)
global Tester instance doctest.master.  Methods of doctest.master
can be called directly too, if you want to do something unusual.
Passing report=0 to testmod is especially useful then, to delay
displaying a summary.  Invoke doctest.master.summarize(verbose)
when you're done fiddling.
testsource(module, name)
Extract the test sources from a doctest docstring as a script.
 
Provide the module (or dotted name of the module) containing the
test to be debugged and the name (within the module) of the object
with the doc string with tests to be debugged.

 
Data
        COMPARISON_FLAGS = 63
DONT_ACCEPT_BLANKLINE = 2
DONT_ACCEPT_TRUE_FOR_1 = 1
ELLIPSIS = 8
IGNORE_EXCEPTION_DETAIL = 32
NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE = 4
REPORTING_FLAGS = 960
REPORT_CDIFF = 128
REPORT_NDIFF = 256
REPORT_ONLY_FIRST_FAILURE = 512
REPORT_UDIFF = 64
SKIP = 16
__all__ = ['register_optionflag', 'DONT_ACCEPT_TRUE_FOR_1', 'DONT_ACCEPT_BLANKLINE', 'NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE', 'ELLIPSIS', 'SKIP', 'IGNORE_EXCEPTION_DETAIL', 'COMPARISON_FLAGS', 'REPORT_UDIFF', 'REPORT_CDIFF', 'REPORT_NDIFF', 'REPORT_ONLY_FIRST_FAILURE', 'REPORTING_FLAGS', 'Example', 'DocTest', 'DocTestParser', 'DocTestFinder', 'DocTestRunner', 'OutputChecker', 'DocTestFailure', ...]
__docformat__ = 'reStructuredText en'
__test__ = {'_TestClass': <class doctest._TestClass at 0xb6c49d7c>, 'blank lines': '\n Blank lines can be marked with ... bar\n <BLANKLINE>\n ', 'bool-int equivalence': '\n In 2.2, boo... False\n ', 'ellipsis': '\n If the ellipsis flag is used, t... [0, 1, 2, ..., 999]\n ', 'string': '\n Example of a string objec... (3, 2)\n ', 'whitespace normalization': '\n If the whitespace normalization...26,\n 27, 28, 29]\n '}